LUND and COMPANY INVENTION, L.L.C.

Sonic Motion!

(Continued from previous post)

Somehow, deep in the structure and chemistry of the brain it occurred to me one day years ago that the vibrations of speakers could power movement like that of the tiny football players from the Tudor game. A mere seven years of research and development and and hundreds of prototypes later we have the first viable application of Sonic Motion, sound and movement powered by a speaker.  

Hold your applause, please, and instead run out to buy all of Hasbro’s Kre-o Cityville Invasion construction sets, a line of 16 SKUs (that’s Stock Keeping Units, for the retail-jargon-challenged) all animated by our Sonic Motion technology. It is patented, versatile, and the most inexpensive means of getting both sound and movement in a toy in the history of the universe.  

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The Circuitous Process of Invention

On the circuitous and langorous processes of invention:

I have long been fascinated by watching the visible movement of speakers as they pump out sound. I remember sulking one Christmas morning when I was a child because I didn't get the classic Tudor vibration action football game that I so dearly wanted. The whole board vibrated and made the football players all move across the surface at the same time. Wow, that was cool!

 And I never got one, I might add.  

(To be continued . . . ) 

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Margins Won't Allow It

"We can’t afford Inventor royalty, nor inventive features in our products."

Wow! This is an approximate quote from an executive of one of the largest US toy companies. From yesterday.  

That sends a shiver up my spine, not surprisingly. Margins won’t allow for inventor royalties and therefore won’t allow the incorporation of those inventive features in new toys hitting the shelves.  

I don't see how that will result in better product. I don’t see the net benefit to the consumer or to society in that mentality. What is the force behind this change in policy? It is the retailers - and not all of them, just a very few.

(To be continued . . . ) 

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Swirling Economic Storms

(Continued from previous post)

We ask to get our prototypes back when our Licensees no longer need them, and they sometimes refuse, for fear that we, or someone else might one day benefit from the use of that prototype.

What they don’t realize is that now, more than ever, we are all truly in the same boat, and the economic and changing cultural storms swirling about affect us all.

It may very well be in all our interests to be more collaborative and help each other succeed. If it is in the interest of the health of the entire industry, then it is in our best interest, as well.  

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All for One and One for All!

The creedo of the Three Musketeers, and the European game industry, as well. Much to my astonishment, I recently learned that European game companies meet yearly TO HELP EACH OTHER!!   

They review each other's new products at early stages to provide useful feedback. They do this to help their competitors make their products better. They do this in the interest of strengthening the entire game industry and therefore, indirectly, in the interest of each of the individual game companies, as well. 

(To be continued . . . ) 

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When a Toy Isn't Any Good

From guest blogger Krishnan Srirangam, Senior Designer at Lund and Company for over 18 years

(Continued from previous post)

After 15 minutes of assembling this toy, you'd hope that you'd be rewarded suitably by that impossible gravity-defying stunt you remembered from the TV spot. It didn't turn out to be that way - in fact, it wasn't any fun to play with at all. Not that there were any false claims, or misleading information, mind you. The dazzling effects of the movie, with its memorable images, holds such power over the consumer, that any toy based on it can be made to look like a winner. The toy manufacturer who has the rights to a brand such as this need only be told, "Two pounds of plastic in a box, please!" by the licensor.

It is sometimes hard to describe why a toy isn't any good, but we all know it when we see it. It is like a boring book or movie. And like a bad book, it goes into the garbage, or recycle bin, never to be talked about or remembered. As for the 8-year old, he has already forgotten it, and has gone back to playing games on his used iPhone.

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